Hello Friends!

Thanks for visiting us on our adventure through eye surgeries, patching practice and food allergies!

Our beautiful warrior is Olivia Reese. In January of 2018, at only 3 months old, she was diagnosed in her right eye with a rare condition known as Persistent Fetal Vasculature (PFV). As parents, my husband and I were a total mess and spent the next few days scouring the internet to find as much information as possible in order to better understand her condition. There was nothing! Not only is this new world of eye conditions was confusing, scary, and most of all hard to find information about. At 8 months old, Olivia was diagnosed with severe food allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, dairy and wheat. This was yet another scary world we were thrown into that we knew nothing about.

We are not doctors, but we hope that our blog, the information we have found and learned about, and the blog posts that our family posts can be of help to anyone else who finds that their child is diagnosed with PFV, dangerous food allergies or any, rare condition.

“The flower that blooms in adversity is the most rare and beautiful of all” – Mulan

5 thoughts on “Hello Friends!

  1. Lesley Ann Acuesta

    Hi! Goodday. My daughter undergo an eye ultrasound 2 years ago when she was still 2months old the impression was Persistent Fetal Vasculature on her Left eye while in her right eye are Multiple vitreous opacity probably vitritis and thickened retinochorodial complex. Right now we are still visiting her optha for any improvements in here eyes, no surgery done and no medicine has been given. I would like to ask for any recommendation as to where we can ask for other medical opinion with regards to our daughters condition, any doctor who can cure here eyes because as of now she has very very low vision and can’t barely see. Please help us. Your suggestion is very big help for us. We are living in the philippines and we are willing to seek medication anywhere just to cure our daughters eye. Please please help us. Thank you so much..

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  2. Hello Lesley! I am so glad my blog has helped in some way! I know that this diagnosis is so scary and over whelming. Why did the doctors feel surgery wasn’t an option? In order for PFV to subside, doctors sometimes need to remove what’s called a “stalk” that is attached from the eye to the retina. Have they checked for Glaucoma? Glaucoma is a complication that can arise for people with PFV where pressures are off – these can also affect her vision and eyes over all health. What sorts of interventions have they suggested so far?

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  3. Lesley

    Hi. Thank you so much for your response. Your blog gave me hope for my daughters eye. We already visited 3- 4 doctors i guess only one of them suggested for surgery but the chances were only five percent and he does not want to proceed with it. I would really appreciate if you could help us or suggest to us the doctor who did the surgery for your daughter. It would be a great help for us..

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  4. We would love to help in anyway we can! So my daughter went to Dr. Ferrone. He is out of Long Island New York and was amazing! He is a brilliant doctor and did Olivias surgery without hiccup. He is well versed in kids like Olivia and your daughter. We would recommend him without question. Olivia also had a detached retina and congenital cataract. He removed the cataract, severed the stalk and re-attached retina all in one surgery. With the cataract removed, it gives Olivia a chance to gain her vision back. Don’t loose hope! I say keep fighting and reach out to these doctors if you are able to travel. It changed our outcome I think. Unfortunately her eye may never gain vision but her eye is healthy now and we know shouldn’t get any worse!

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  5. Lesley

    Thank you so much for these information, it would be a great help for us. If you don’t mind how much does the surgery cost? So we can prepare enough money in case she will be referred for surgery..

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