Out to lunch!

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Lunch holds a special place in my heart. Growing up, my mom and I would go out to lunch to talk about break ups, Disney trips, the future, really anything! We would share an appetizer of cheesy french fries (our guiltiest pleasure) and talk forever. Lunch dates with my mom make up some of my favorite memories and continue to be one of my favorite things to do on a rainy afternoon, with my momma (shout out to the best mom ever ๐Ÿ˜‰ )

When Olivia was born, I was SO excited to add her to our little outing! But I would be lying if I told you that this was an easy feat. When we first found out about her food allergies, going out to lunch was over! My mom and I would look at menus and see nothing but cheese (we miss you cheese fries!) and nuts on salads, desserts and even in pesto pasta! Resteraunts went from my favorite place to be, to my worst nightmare!

But with time, my mom, Olivia and I figured it out. We have a few select resteraunts that we trust to let Olivia be in the booths – for us these are Ninety Nine Resteraunt, Longhorn Steakhouse and BGood to name a few!

But the other day, I did what seemed so scary at first. I took Olivia out to lunch – just me and her! I felt like I was giving Olivia what my mom had given me growing up – that alone time together to talk, laugh and eat with one another. I was so nervous and of course, FaceTimed my mom multiple times, but we did it! Olivia was reaction free, I enjoyed a delicious Zoodle bowl and Olivia climbed all over the seat while enjoying her chickpea pasta and meatballs.

Hereโ€™s to not letting food allergies define you. We are strong together. We must be prepared but paranoid. Canโ€™t wait to have so many more lunches! In the meantime, we will just keep patching!

Little Milestones

Our Latest Adventures, Our Patching Stories, Uncategorized

I remember when we were first told Olivia would need to put a patch over her dominant eye in strengthen her Nemo eye, I was horrified. So, as we all do, I took to Instagram to read about how other families deal with patching a baby/toddler and what types of accounts I could locate with some good advice. I came across one of the most popular and respected instagrams that showed an adorable little boy that was a master patcher – and his mom, of course is a saint. She had posted a video of her little patcher opening the patch all by himself to get ready for patch time and I was completely blown away! As our avid readers know, (hi moms ๐Ÿ˜‰ ) when we put Olivia’s patch on in the mornings, it starts with a cute, catchy little song but almost always continues into a meltdown. I couldn’t even begin to imagine a time where Olivia would feel so comfortable with the patch and her eyes would be strong enough, to focus on such a small object, and open it on her own.

Since Olivia only has one eye with strong vision, she has very little to no depth perception. This makes some fine motor skills sometimes hard for her to grasp. So, in theory, using eyes to focus in on a small patch in front of her and having enough visual acuity and fine motor ability to peel apart the patch should be near impossible for this tiny human. But you guessed it…she took after her fellow patching friend and opened the patch all on her own!!

Now, there are both pros and cons to her new discovery. Pros: this shows that her eyes are getting stronger, her fine motor skills are improving and she isn’t afraid of the patches and what they represent! The cons: as many of you know, patches are really expensive! So we have to be super careful about leaving them around because she WILL open them, and stick them to her clothes, the iPad screen, or even the cat! She is starting to put together that every time I see her steal a patch and open it, it ends up on her eye and results in some serious patching hours – so she has slowed down a bit – our little smart cookie.

Since the surgery, our patching time has been significantly cut short so that her eye can properly heal. She has some residual swelling and redness which has required extra goopy ointment that makes her vision even more blurry. But, we are still hitting our 60 minutes a day until we get the all clear to work our way back up to 3 hours! Olivia is starting to become an active participant in everything patch time so you know what we are going to do…just keep patching :).

It’s been a year??

Our Latest Adventures, Uncategorized

January 24th, 2018. The date is burned into my head like the day she was born. We woke up on January 24th like any other day. I remember this morning so vividly because I had just put our 2 month old baby in the CUTEST Gymboree corduroys with a purple polar bear onesie – and yes, it even had a matching headband. I got her to take a nap BY HERSELF which was a huge feat for me 2 months post-pardem. Last minute, my mom had decided to come with me to our first ever optomology appointment. Not for any particular reason. We both knew something was off about Olivia’s eye but we expected them to confirm our suspicions she had a really lazy eye and would need glasses. So my mom was really just coming along to give me a hand with the car seat and watch the baby when I needed to fill out paper work. In pure newborn fashion – and this is the reason I remember that gorgeous outfit so vividly on this exact day – Olivia blew out her diaper right as we were walking out the door. My mom and I tag teamed giving her the quickest wipe down, new diaper, outfit change known to man, and got in the car on our way to a seemingly routine appointment. Little did we know, huh?

We went into the doctors office and I sat in the optomologist chair with such a nieve and giant smile on my face as the doctor looked into Olivia’s eyes. All of a sudden, the mood in the room changed from light and bubbly to heavy and stiff. The doctor took a deep breath and told me that she could see that Olivia had a cataract in her affected eye. I remember thinking to myself…WHAT?! Only people over the age of 80 get cataracts?! She explained to me, using a fancy diagram on the wall, that the cataract was like a film over her eye – that was blocking light from coming in. She explained that Olivia was unable to see through where the eye was blocked. She said the cataract was most likely caused by something called Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous also known as Persistent Fetal Vasculature and that this was extremely rare. The doctor left the room to get whatever pamphlet they had hidden away, covered in dust in the back of a forgotten filing cabiniet because she had never seen a child with this condition in her career.

This is where I thank God my mom had decided to come with me. She is very intuitive and must have known that we would need her on this specific day. My mind went completely black. As the door closed, I broke down into the deepest cry I have ever done. I squeezed my daughter and cried. At some point, my mom came up and took Olivia and I in an embrace I will forever be grateful for because it kept me from falling to the ground. I couldn’t believe what we had thought was a routine appointment had just turned our lives upside down. I called my husband as my mom cradled the baby and told him to get over to the doctors right away. He dropped everything and was there before the doctor returned with the informational packets – he works as a teacher at the school that was conveniently located down the road from this office. When the doctor came back in, she suggested we get a second opinion from one of her colleagues to be sure of the diagnosis. She left us with the next doctor we would be heading to see, a warning that surgery may be necessary and a request for us to come back and tell her how it all goes.

My husband and I hugged our little girl the tightest we ever had before. We thanked God that the little black spot the pediatrician had seen wasn’t cancer and that we finally had answers to why our baby’s eye wouldn’t focus straight on. We were going home with heavy hearts and tear stained faces but a plan moving forward. My mom drove us home and within the hour I had another appointment booked with the cataract specialist – for 2 hours later! My husband pulled into the driveway and jumped into my car to take the hour trek to Stratford. As you know from reading the blog ๐Ÿ™‚ the next doctor confirmed that Olivia did indeed have PFV that caused her to develop a cataract in her Nemo eye.

From there, we went home ate so much ice cream (this was pre-dairy allergy), drank some wine and found comfort in each other. Our lives had changed forever. For some reason, the two of us still had hope this was all a nightmare and that when we got to the retina specialist in New York a couple days later, he would say Olivia was all better. We now know that was not what happened, but we found solace in hoping for the best.

Writing about how I felt one year ago has brought back how dark this day was for my family. We had just started our journey as parents and were thrust into a situation that even seasoned parents would be overwhelmed by. Looking back, I am so proud of how we handled this day. For as dark as it was, we never turned our back on each other. We took care of our little girl while also taking care of our marriage. When I started thinking that I caused Olivia to have PFV (as every PFV mom thinks at one point in diagnosis even though its completely ridiculous) my husband was there to remind me that there was no way that could be. When he would crumble and cry at the thought of putting our tiny two month old under anesthesia, I would pick him up and remind him it would be okay. It’s true that you never know how you will react in a crisis until you are dealt one – but ill tell you, I’m proud of who we were, how we dealt with impossible odds and how we lifted each other up.

Despite this dark day, I think about how far we have come. I would NEVER have expected one year ago that Olivia would be thriving the way that she is. I am shocked and impressed every day to see how she is crushing her developmental milestones, patched or not. We have gone through two major eye surgeries, constant three hour trips to New York, three hotel stays, countless hours of patching, multiple different eye drops and too many long nights to count – but we made it out the other side, together. We are only in the beginning of this journey but with these two by my side, and this tribe we have backing us – I know, we will just keep patching.